muccamukk: text 'Writers expressed themselves with cymbals' with a picture of a set of cymbals (Books: Writing)
[personal profile] muccamukk
What I Just Finished Reading
Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party by Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin Jr., narrated by Ron Butler
Coming from the standpoint of knowing basically zero about any of this, I thought this book was a really good place to start. It laid out the social and political background, how the movement formed and why, the main players and their backgrounds and what happened from there.

It was a little bit repetitive, and the timeline zigzagged a bit, but mostly it read very well.

I would like to read some individual stories by Panthers, as this book was meant to be more academic, and I feel like there's a lot of voice and emotion left out.


Watership Down by Richard Adams
Third time I've read this, but first in a few years, but I remember so much of it so vividly from when Dad read it to use when we were young. It is very difficult to talk about a book as deeply foundational as this one. I noticed more character details this time, how the stories built on each other, how the chapter quotes tied in. Still in love with it, still get teary at the end.


The Selection (The Selection #1) by Kiera Cass
Hard one to rate. One one hand, was it good? No. The world building is meant for people who thought the Hunger Games was too deeply considered and realistic, the obvious love triangle is obvious and all plot twists were predictable from page one.

However, I've gotta say that I needed to buzz through a book like this for pure soap to reset my brain, and it does exactly what it says on the tin entirely competently. I'll probably read the next two, while I'm at it.


The Raven and the Reindeer by T. Kingfisher
So this is pretty much a creepy Nordic mythology retelling of Snow Queen except with lesbians. I was a fan. It was also really funny, and the characters felt well built and real. I loved all the talking creatures.


A Story as Sharp as a Knife: The Classical Haida Mythtellers and Their World by Robert Bringhurst
Absolutely fascinating and probably better read more slowly or more times than I did. As the traditions are so absolutely different than literature I'm familiar with, I had a hard time getting a lot of them as clearly as Bringhurst wanted me to, I think. What I did get was slightly dizzying in scope, and I feel like I'll need to go back to it.

Bringhurst was also selling his point hard that he was talking about proper art, which was more or less preaching to the choir, but I suppose it did someone good. I should like to hear it spoken, as pronunciation guides elude me.


The Lost Child of Lychford (Lychford #2) by Paul Cornell
Very enjoyable, more so even than the first one. I liked tying in the bedevilment of Christmas rush for the vicar with actual bedevilment, and how the women are starting to work together as a team. It could have been a little too direct, but let each woman have their own beliefs and ways of thinking about and using magic. I'd be happy to read more of tor.com wants to publish them.


What I'm Reading Now
From the library: Obsessive Genius: The Inner World of Marie Curie by Barbara Goldsmith, which I just started, but is interesting so far. I'm curious how much it will include that I hadn't hit on the Curie research binge I did for that LoT fic.
Audio: The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the Scientific Revolution by Deborah E. Harkness, which I'm almost done, and was absolutely fascinating.


What I'm Reading Next
Probably finish up a few audiobooks I left hanging, then work through the library stack (in order of dueness):
Hot pterodactyl boyfriend by Alan Cumyn
Four wars of 1812 by D. Peter MacLeod with the Canadian War Museum 1812 team
Tecumseh & Brock: the War of 1812 by James Laxer
The theatre of the world: alchemy, astrology and magic in Renaissance Prague by Peter Marshall.
A two-spirit journey: the autobiography of a lesbian Ojibwa-Cree elder by Ma-Nee Chacaby with Mary Louisa Plummer
From:
Anonymous( )Anonymous This account has disabled anonymous posting.
OpenID( )OpenID You can comment on this post while signed in with an account from many other sites, once you have confirmed your email address. Sign in using OpenID.
User
Account name:
Password:
If you don't have an account you can create one now.
Subject:
HTML doesn't work in the subject.

Message:

 
Notice: This account is set to log the IP addresses of everyone who comments.
Links will be displayed as unclickable URLs to help prevent spam.
Page generated Jul. 22nd, 2017 08:51 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios