muccamukk: Juli on a ladder shelving library books, sunbeams giving him wings. (Heart of Thomas: Wings)
What I Just Finished Reading

Guest of Honor by Deborah Davis
A lot of this book felt like filler, going into eating habits of past presidents and various largely unrelated people, and the first third or so was pretty basic biography (probably more interesting to someone who had not just read Up from Slavery). However, once it hit the relationship between Washington and Roosevelt, it picked up quickly. There were lots of great original quotes from news media at the time, and details of the complicated interaction of race and celebrity.

I'm glad I read it so close to Washington's own book, as it presents him in a very different light than what was essential a sales pitch for his school. He was a lot more politically involved than he liked people to think. Of course being a Washington book, it can't help but take the odd shot at Du Bois (no one seems to like both), and was more in favour of Roosevelt than I've seen in other places.


Tiger in the Hot Zone (Shifter Agents #4) by Lauren Esker
Like the Dragon story, this one was more mystery adventure, and less romance, especially in the latter half. However, the romance was well done and I believed in the couple who were really sweet together, and what I really WANTED was a continuation of the arc plot from last book. Which I got in spades.

I liked both MC's. Their issues felt real to me, and affected how they acted, but weren't OTT melodramatic like some romances are. I really enjoyed watching them learning to trust each other and working out how they could be a couple when they're from such totally different sides of the tracks.

Also the revelations of the mystery were AWESOME. Total vote for more Valeria plot soon.

(I received a free advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.)


A Two-Spirit Journey: The Autobiography of a Lesbian Ojibwa-Cree Elder by Ma-Nee Chacaby, with Mary Louisa Plummer
So this was very well told, but also by nature of the story incredibly brutal (I switched to a book about North Korea for something less depressing). I would have liked more insight into what being two-spirit meant to Ma-Nee, but even without that her life was very interesting, and I liked how the book was put together. Really worth a read, but pretty well warnings for everything.


Buffalo Soldier by Maurice Broaddus
I'm not always into steampunk, but I appreciated how this one just handwaved everything science and went straight for a political thriller, which was very well done. There was a lot of action jammed into a 100-page novella, but the characters still felt fleshed out and I liked the shape of the world. Desmond, our hero, managed to get a fair bit of backstory and characterisation into relatively few info dumps, and most of the ones he included were meta commentary on storytelling itself, which was neat.


Wishful Drinking by Carrie Fisher
Absolutely hilarious. I can see how it was adapted from a monologue, as the voice is so strong and the format is really fast-moving with lots of jokes and pictures. It took me a couple hours to read through. The more serious matter in the book (all of it really) is played pretty lightly, but no less touching for that. Of course, some of it is made more tragic in retrospect.


The Jewel and Her Lapidary by Fran Wilde
Interesting format and intense storytelling, but I'd probably had a longer book in the same world that wasn't as tragic. Especially given small spoiler )


All Monsters Must Die: An Excursion to North Korea by Magnus Bärtås, Fredrik Ekman, translated by Saskia Vogel
If you don't know much about North Korea (which I don't), this is a solid if somewhat whimisically organised introduction to the country's history and culture. It's set in two frames: a tour the authors went on, and the country's film industry, especially as it related to the kidnapping of two South Korean directors. As much as I might have appreciated something more straightforwardly chronological, I found this book very interesting, and it did answer most of my questions.


Black Like Us: A Century of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual African American Fiction edited by Don Weise
As with most anthologies, it's a mixed bag. The historical essays were great for setting up the context, but then the inclusion of stories written before 1950 was very slim, and not much more before 1980 either. I also wish there had been more short stories and fewer novel excerpts (especially ones depicting graphic rape and on-page gay bashing leading to death). However, I also found a lot of great new-to-me authors, and revisited some old favourites.


Also listened to that Peter Grant story that's free over at Audible, which was cute.

What I'm Reading Now
Library: The Ariadne Objective: The Underground War to Rescue Crete from the Nazis by Wes Davis, which is fine, but way, way too focused on the British officers, and not terribly interested in the Greeks.

E-book: Chalk by Paul Cornell, which is creepy as fuck.

What I'm Reading Next
I keep meaning to get to that latest Erin Bow novel.

GIP

May. 18th, 2017 06:23 pm
muccamukk: Diana as a child, riding her horse through a field. (WW: Horse)
So how cool was that Star Trek Beyond trailer? Maybe it'll even air someday.

Also, Nenya and I are on vacation for the next two weeks or so, so Internet access might be a bit intermittent. Or mine will be. Nenya has her phone.
muccamukk: Cap pulling Iron Man to his feet. Text: "Help you stand." (Marvel: Help You Stand)
[tumblr.com profile] stonytrumpshate is starting bidding on Sunday, if you're interested in getting Steve/Tony related things in exchange for a donation to charity. I have an auction page here.
muccamukk: A basket with a seal in it. Text: WTF!? (Politics: Phoque (WTF!?))
[personal profile] sovay: it'll be the joke about [infinitesimal amount] to push the button, [incalculable amount] to know which button to push.

So in various efforts to trouble shoot last night, I walked over to the router, unplugged the cable from the modem, plugged it into my laptop, bashed around for a while trying to get it to kick my off DW (it didn't), and plugged the router back into the modem again.

In the last eighteen or so hours since I did that, DW hasn't logged me out, no matter how many http links I click, Nenya same.

*hands*

I don't know what changed, but I'll take it!
muccamukk: Mystique slidding away while flipping the bird. (X-Men: Flicking Off)
Time I logged back in (reason it logged me out)
  • Mon, 15 May 2017 20:41:27 GMT (The time it logged me out because I clicked on a link from the search page)

  • Mon, 15 May 2017 21:03:54 GMT (The time it logged me out because I clicked on a link to a post from a notification e-mail)

  • Mon, 15 May 2017 23:26:58 GMT (The time it logged me out because I entered Nenya's profile into the address bar, instead of clicking through to it from my profile)

  • Mon, 15 May 2017 23:27:22 GMT (The time I tried to log in just by using the log in box at the top of the screen, not by going through the official log in page, whereupon it just reloaded the page but left me logged out.)

(And this is despite me usually being really careful ONLY to read my reading list from the readinglist page, and to open all links in private windows so it doesn't dump my log in.)

I've put in two tickets for help. [staff profile] denise at one point left a comment with a possible solution (call your IP) that didn't work at all. And said something about my router. No idea what that entails. (Which, like, she's running the whole site, so I'm not saying she should drop everything and sort out two users, or anything like that.)

I am really, really fucking sick of this. I just want to be able to use the damn website. (And yes, it's ONLY this site, and yes I've cleared my cookies, and deleted my cache and done a dance to the Internet god. It is something specific in the interaction between this Internet connection and Dreamwidth's login. Nothing else.)
muccamukk: Gregory Peck looks up from the book he's reading. (Books: Hello Reading)
I've decided that Murderbot from All Systems Red is my patronus. I'm just a super-cranky robot with a media addiction, people.

Liked by don't have any particular comment on Doctor Who 10x04. I do wonder if Susan is to show up, the "grandfather" thing seems to underline her story. I think I was right about last week's vault guess.


We rewatched Spellbound, which I still love, based almost entirely on aesthetics. I'm convinced that the movie was made because Selznick had the rights to the book, but no one was terribly interested in actually reading the book, and then Selznick wanted to include Freudian analysis, but Hitchcock had zero interest in that, except to say, "Oh, hey, symbolism. Let's hire Dali. He likes symbolism," then made up a bunch of total bullshit based on Selznick rambling on about his therapy sessions. Apparently they had a psychiatry consultant, but I strongly suspect no one listened to her. (I admit that, on a personal level, this gives me a small amount of vindictive glee. I have an inherited dislike of Freudian analysis (my paternal grandfather was in that line of work, and saying that it did that side of the family no good whatsoever would be putting it really fucking mildly), and seeing it cheerfully trampled pleases me.)

But honestly, the main point of this movie, and almost certainly why it was a hit, is because Gregory Peck is in peak Wounded Gazelle mode, and spends most of the movie looking like this:

Saying things like, "I'm not worth loving!" and fainting dramatically.

Meanwhile, Ingrid Bergman takes charge, stalwartly solves all the mysteries while shepherding him around, dodging the police, and looking like this:

Saying things like, "Pull yourself together!" and petting his hair while he's unconscious.

That's all I'm here for, people.

(Meanwhile, Nenya has a rant about rogue queer theory and people being Wrong On the Internet: Constance Peterson Defense Squad)


We also watched Captain Newman, M.D., which more or less has the premise that Gregory Peck from 1963 treats Gregory Peck from 1949, and cracked me up on those grounds. (In 1949, Peck played Frank Savage in Twelve O'Clock High, a bomber group commander who pushed himself and all his men to mental exhaustion and then pushed them all right over the edge. In '63 he played Dr. Joe Newman, a psychiatrist treating Army Air Corpmen, largely from the bomber command, suffering from various psychological ailments.) It was on the whole a rather sweet drama/comedy, which mostly pulled its humour from army shenanigans, and not from making fun of the mentally ill. Reminded me a bit of M*A*S*H the TV series for style of humour.
muccamukk: Dot and Phryne looking at each other and smiling, pretty hats. (MFMM: Companions)
I needed some floral perfumes for spring/early summer, since my core set is all amber and leather based. Fortunately, someone in my circle also runs Lilac & Moss, and Lilac & Moss has less appaling flatrate shipping to Canada than BPAL, so that worked out. I bought two bottles, and got a sample as well.

(Can I just say that I'm a big fan of roller-top bottles?)

Kythereia
Smooth earl grey and tonka bean mingle with fragrant roses, but smoke and a dash of pepper lie underneath to remind you of Aphrodite’s potential for wrath.
I'm not sure what a tonka bean is, but I suspect it's the majority of the wet scent here, with a little bit of something else sweet. Then it dries even sweeter, and I started thinking, I put way too much of this on!, but dry the rose comes out and it settles into a smokey earl grey background with rose in front. It's kind of a warm, mature floral. Found it wears off a little fast. Characters: Eight (Doctor Who), Maz (SW: TFA), Ana (Agent Carter).

Mossflower
Fresh lilac and rose lay on top of moss and dirt. Floral but earthy, reminiscent of true lilac bushes in full bloom during a visit to Cape Cod.
Wet it's pretty much damp greenhouse, which is nice, but sort of greenhousey. As it dries, more and more lilac comes out, until dry it's almost entirely lilac with a titch of rose, and a nice underlay of dirt to hold it down. It doesn't actually smell like dirt! The dirt just keeps it from getting that sort of tacky over-sweetness a lot of lilac stuff has. I've been looking for a solid straight lilac for a while now, and I think I've found it. It's sweet and floral, but isn't frilly. It also lasts for ages. Characters: Dot (Miss Fisher), Samwise (LotR), Kaylee (Firefly).

Sample: Sappho
Starts off strongly violet, but after a few moments, rose, lily, peony, and crisp air blossom through.
Nope. It's lovely and green wet, and then I put it on and it goes straight to rose soap. It's a nice rose soap, if a little heavy on the lye, but it's rose soap nonetheless. I thought maybe it was my skin, so I put some on Nenya, and periodically smelled her neck (which was very nice), and rose soap there too. Ah well.
muccamukk: Gregory Peck looks up from the book he's reading. (Books: Hello Reading)
Long promised, finally made.

Notes on methodology (haha):
  • I watched twenty three movies for this project.

  • Movie selection was based on what I felt like watching based on summaries and whim of the moment.

  • The chart includes almost all of Peck's early career, and almost nothing following 1962. There are next to no Westerns.

  • Inclusion on this flowchart is because I watched the movie, not because I thought it was good, though hopefully the choices give some idea of content. Other Movies tag has reviews of most of these.

  • This chart was getting out of hand, so I split it into three parts based on aesthetic, as follows:

    • Wounded Gazelle: The entirety of his career between 1944 and 1949, when he was coasting on a good deal of earnestness and not a whole lot of acting talent. (Excludes one movie because life is too short for Ernest Hemingway.)

    • Big Damn Hero: Mostly war or military movies, mostly filmed in the 1950s.

    • Hot Dad: What it says on the tin.

  • Some movies are repeated across sections. A movie appearing twice just means it fits both, not that I rec it twice as much.

  • The list assumes that you find Gregory Peck attractive and charming, and are more or less watching movies based on that fact.

  • Made on OpenOffice Draw. I am, clearly, not greatly experienced in graphic design.

Flowchart behind cut )

(Also on tumblr)
muccamukk: Milady with her chin on her hand, looking pensive. (Musketeers: Thinking)
I'd been avoiding this one because the plot (Gregory Peck pretends to be Jewish in order to write a magazine series on anti-Semitism) sounded unbelievably cheesy and liable to trigger my embarrassment squick so hard that I would be forced to fling myself into the bay. Having been assured that it's "Not totally cringeworthy" and also been lured in by Dean Stockwell (who also played Peck's son in Valley of Decision for 2.5 scenes, but wasn't credited, and I didn't recognise him), plus it being in the middle of Peck's wounded gazelle phase, Nenya and I decided to give it a go.

It wasn't totally cringeworthy. Though I did watch the first part while slightly high, which may have helped. (Peck: I even know the title, "I was Jewish for six months!" Me: I am not NEARLY high enough for this.)

I've been thinking a lot about what it was trying to do, what it managed to do, and what all that looked like seventy years later. Rambly feelings, spoilers, Christian's opinions on movie about anti-Semitism, long. )
muccamukk: Boromir with a blue filter. (LotR: Boromir Blue)
What I Just Finished Reading
The Children of Húrin by J.R.R. Tolkien and Christopher Tolkien, narrated by Christopher Lee
About 80% of my positive feelings about this are because of Christopher Lee reading the audiobook. He seemed to be having a good time, and I enjoyed listening to him. The other 20% is for a couple added characters and the general prettiness of Tolkein's writing. 0% is for Turin, who I've never liked, and this book makes even more unlikable. The entire story always struck me is completely pointless. I was never sure what the curse was meant to be? Was it just inflicting Turin on as many people as possible? The man had no redeeming features other than he was pretty and good in a fight, but all the decent characters kept getting in fights over him like he was the best thing ever. In any case, it was certainly a very effective curse. I don't know why Morgoth didn't just curse all his enemies and let them finish each other off.


Updraft (Bone Universe #1) by Fran Wilde, narrated by Khristine Hvam
Very different from the short stories I've read by Wilde (which tend to creepy), but still really enjoyable. I've never read a setting quite like this, and the details and practicalities of it seem very well thought out. I liked how the language shaped around the air world. The origins of the world aren't explained at all, but I hope future books will get more into what the towers are and where they came from.

The culture built on the world was shocking in its brutality. The contrast between the physical beauty of the place and the ruthlessness of the laws worked really well. As is usual for heroines of YA dystopias, our girl is the right person at the right place at the right time, but it worked for me here more than it often does.

Our Heroine was an interesting character. She was easy to identify with her ambitions and hopes, but was occasionally frustrating to read as she rarely seemed to think a proposition through and only felt moral quandaries when she came at them face to face. Which I suppose is not unlike many teenagers. She did seem to be learning by the end? (I'm not sure if this is an offshoot of an uncritical heroine or editing errors, but there seemed to be continuity errors where the same thing would occur to her for the first time more than once.)

Really looking forward to the next one.


Up from Slavery by Booker T. Washington, narrated by Noah Waterman
This is essentially 100+ pages of pamphlet trying to raise funds for his school, and is thus relentlessly optimistic and positive. I think the only things he said he didn't like in the whole book were lynchings and unions.

I found Washington as he presents himself here somewhat difficult to relate to, but still found this book compelling. It's certainly an ode to bootstrapping and respectability politics, but on the other hand it's very hard to speak against the sincere effort the man put into doing as much good as possible, for as many as possible. At one point, he's asked what he does for fun, and he basically says that for fun he likes to get his work done early in the day so he can do more work later in the day. Which I believe. He seems to have married a series of workaholic women and produced with them an equal number of workaholic children. We hear very little about his interior life, though the sections about his anxiety and love of gardening were touching.

I'm very interested to read an outside look at his life, as so much of this book was positioning himself very deliberately in the political situation of 1900. Which was probably the most interesting part of the book, though I'm somewhat lacking on context.

(I'd queued up a bunch of these books for February, then ended up not listening to many of them.)


All Systems Red (The Murderbot Diaries #1) by Martha Wells
Our Hero in this is a pretty standard Wells character: The lost young person with out a family or home, who falls in with a new group of people and has to decide who they are in relation to their new circumstances. We saw it with Moon in the Raksura books, and all the way back to Cade in The Element of Fire. This book crams a lot of emotional journey and backstory into a very small space, but when we meet the Murderbot (no name, no gender), it's already in the middle of its story, already traumatised, newly free, it mostly just wants to hang out and watch tv, and not interact with people at all ever. Given my recent brushes with depression, boy do I feel that damn Murderbot. The secondary characters are pretty vague and I mostly couldn't keep them straight, but I think that was mostly a sign of how little the Murderbot cared about them.

I've heard a couple different opinions on where the story goes from there (I was spoiled on the ending going in). It's certainly a different place from where I would have thought it was going to go, based on having read a fair bit of Wells, but for me the ending worked. It especially resonated with my interaction with depression and coming out of depression. I'm interested to read the next one.

(ETA: SPOILERS for this in comments)


What I'm Reading Now
Library: A Two-Spirit Journey: The Autobiography of a Lesbian Ojibwa-Cree Elder by Ma-Nee Chacaby with Mary Louisa Plummer. I'm somewhat stalling out as it's really bleak, but she's just gotten sober, so I hope the rest of her life will be less horrible.

Audio: Guest of Honor by Deborah Davis, about Booker T. Washington's dinner at the White House. Just started it, so far retreading Up From Slavery as context.


What I'm Reading Next
May continue my abandoned black history month reading and hit Souls of Black Folks on audio. Also library books.
muccamukk: Girl sitting on a forest floor, reading a book and surrounded by towers of more books. (Books: So Many Books)
Missed this last week because I was too embarrassed to admit that I was still plodding through the 1812 book.

What I Just Finished Reading
Penric’s Mission by Lois McMaster Bujold, narrated by Grover Gardner
Another enjoyable outing, though the plot of this one didn't grab me as much as the first two. I enjoyed the new PoV character and liked meeting her and her family, and watching their relationship with Penric and Des grow. Penric is frankly getting a little over powered at this point. There doesn't really seem to be much he can't do, as long as he can figure it out. Still, I love Des, and the stories continue to be light and funny.


Terror in the Starboard Seat by Dave McIntosh
(Memoirs of an RCAF Mosquito navigator in WWII, who very much wanted to survive the war and go home, while his Jewish-American pilot wanted to kill as many Nazis as he possibly could.)

Highly entertaining, which makes the tragic parts even more of a punch. Both the author and his pilot never seem to miss a chance to tell a joke at each other's (and their own) expense. For all that McIntosh played up the battle to stay out of the line of fire while his pilot put them in it, they seemed to work pretty well together. The accounts of base life and interactions with the other pilots and the English were probably the funniest parts.


Tinseltown: Murder, Morphine, and Madness at the Dawn of Hollywood by William J. Mann, narrated by Christopher Lane
This ended up being something of a guilty pleasure. The style is way over the top and pulpy that I expected it to have been written in the early '50s, but that in itself circled back around to being charming despite itself. I don't know enough about the period to claim authorial bias one way or another, but all the characters were well introduced and easy to follow. Likewise I have no idea if the mystery solution is plausible, but the case was well made. I need to read more silent-era Hollywood books.


Tecumseh and Brock: The War of 1812 by James Laxer
It certainly a decent outline of the war, and I appreciated that it had more focus on the native American storyline than a lot of books do. However since both the title characters died very early in the war, it somewhat floundered for a theme in the latter third. (It eventually settled on minimizing American accomplishments, in a charmingly chippy way.)


The One (The Selection #3) by Kiera Cass
Still 100% soapy nonsense, still pretty fun, still needs more lesbians. Got pretty melodramatic at the end there. I don't see why love triangles never seem to end in threesomes.


What I'm Reading Now
Library: A Two-Spirit Journey: The Autobiography of a Lesbian Ojibwa-Cree Elder by Ma-Nee Chacaby with Mary Louisa Plummer. Um. Yeah. HOLY FUCK THIS WOMAN'S CHILDHOOD.
Audio: The Children of Húrin by J.R.R. Tolkien. It's read by Chris Lee, which is pretty much all you need to know.

What I'm Reading Next
Probably a book about North Korea from the library. Not sure on audiobook.

Icons

Apr. 25th, 2017 12:37 pm
muccamukk: Bill and Twevle wearing forced smiles of distress. (DW: happyhappyhappy)
I made two non-spoilery icons for Doctor Who 10x02. Feel free to take and alter as you like.

muccamukk: A basket with a seal in it. Text: WTF!? (Politics: Phoque (WTF!?))
Enjoyed Doctor Who 10x02 "Smile." Though it's one of those situations where it's best just to coast on the banter and not really think too hard about the plot. It was one heck of a gorgeous episode in any case, and I do need a Bill icon from it. I'm still loving Bill's practicality and this slightly lighter, bouncier Twelve. Long may it last. They're having fun with not telling about the mystery so far, too (it's Gallifrey). Looking forward to next week.


Nenya and I watched Yellow Sky, which was a competent western staring Gregory Peck and Anne Baxter. It was only slightly rapey and a little bit racist, and had some nice cinematography, so I'm calling it okay for a Western.

We then watched Lust in the Dust Duel in the Sun, which I expected to be basically the same but in technicolor, and boy was it not.

To understand this movie, you have to picture this: The year is 1945, and our hero lies alone in a Florida swamp. He has spent months playing the happiest homesteader in history, despite the fact that his costars are 126 deer, 9 black bears, 37 dogs, 17 buzzards, 1 owl, 83 chickens, 36 pigs, 8 rattlesnakes, 18 squirrels, 4 horses, 17 raccoons and the world's most annoying child actor. Also Jane Wyman. He's not allowed to make out with Jane Wyman. It's a family picture, so the most he can do is put his arm around her shoulders, stare into the matte-painted sunrise, and say things like, "Golly, the Lord sure made a mighty fine day to plant corn on, ain't He?" (The director made them cut the "golly.") In between swatting mosquitoes, our hero writes to the man currently holding his contract. "Dear Mr. Selznick, Next time, please cast me in the opposite of this. Third billing is fine. Yours ever, Gregory."

Let it never be said that David O. Selznick didn't come through on that one! Below there be spoilers, and screenshots (including a regrettablely small amount of shirtlessness, and a regrettablely large amount of brownface). )

Short recs

Apr. 23rd, 2017 02:32 pm
muccamukk: Spock casually leaning in a doorway, arms folded. (ST: Spock)
Alive by anon: great vid about Jaylah from Star Trek Beyond, including a bunch of stuff from a comic.

We Think By Feeling by [archiveofourown.org profile] nagi_schwarz: Cougar/Jensen The Losers fusion with Equilibrium. Cougar, a Cleric sniper, watches Jensen, a rebel.
muccamukk: Darcy sitting at a table drinking coffee, flowers on her right. (Thor: Breakfast Table)
Comment with one of my fandoms, and I'll tell you:

the character I least understand
interactions I enjoyed the most
the character who scares me the most
the character who is mostly like me
hottest looks character
one thing I dislike about my fave character
one thing I like about my hated character
a quote or scene that haunts me
a death that left me indifferent
a character I wish died but didn’t
my ship that never sailed
muccamukk: General Organa looking up. (SW: The General)
Title: Undiminished (The Planets and Islands Remix)
Remix of: No Man is an Island (the Drowned World remix) by actonbell
Author: [personal profile] muccamukk
Fandom: Star Wars (Mostly OT and TFA)
Rating: Teen
Word Count: 2,100
Notes: Written for [community profile] starwarsrollingremix, reveals here.
Summary: Five times Leia Organa left home, and built a new one.

I strongly rec basically every other fic in this collection, but especially the Rogue Squadron chain, which does some very cool stuff with mythology. Oh, and the rest of my chain, which is amazing. POE!


Links:
[personal profile] fuesch has made Doctor Who icons from all eras, including some non-spoilery ones of Bill and Bill&12.

(Via [personal profile] kjata) Men Recommend David Foster Wallace to Me by Deirdre Coyle.

(Via [personal profile] marthawells) Issue one of Anathema Magazine is out. Anathema: Spec from the Margins is a free, online tri-annual magazine publishing speculative fiction (SF/F/H, the weird, slipstream, surrealism, fabulism, and more) by queer people of colour on every range of the LGBTQIA spectrum. I subscribed for a year.

Save the Unicorn Humble Book Bundle.

Volunteers, Professionals, and Who Gets to Have Fun at Cons by Michi Trota.
muccamukk: Close up of Rey wearing a beat up X-Wing pilot's helmet and looking up at the sky. (SW: Dream of Stars)
When the Star Wars: The Last Jedi teaser dropped, I watched it three times and then woke Nenya up and made her watch it. Nenya: That... doesn't really show anything new. Me: *wanders around cheerfully humming Binary Sunset theme for next two days.* Apparently I'm easy.

"Carrie Fisher Was a Script Doctor For Star Wars: The Last Jedi"

Star Wars - The Force Awakens - Rey's Theme - Violin vs. Machine cover.

Most of you know now I have a mixed relationship with Moffat's run, which has followed my mixed relationship with RTD's run. I watched the last two Christmas specials, liked the River one, was kinda meh on the super hero one, hadn't watched the last series with Clara because the previous series with Clara pissed me off so badly. I love Capaldi generally, but found that Twelve wasn't really my Doctor (though he was more my Doctor than Matt Smith, admittedly). I liked Clara, but her plots often made me want to set my hair on fire, so I bailed for a bit.

Doctor Who 10x01: "The Pilot." OMG! I LOVED THIS EPISODE! I love Bill. I love her relationship with what seems to be a kinder, lighter Twelve. I like Nardol and how he seems to be the one proping up the Doctor, rather than the companion doing all the emotional h/c stuff. Spoilers )

Apparently Kris Marshall is the odds on favourite for the new Doctor. Please no.

I watched Cape Fear, or rather I watched the bits of Cape Fear that weren't showing women being terrorised. It was a short movie.

Nenya and I watched The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, which we both really liked. There have been a million movies about white suburban malaise in the 1950s, and I guess this was one of the first. I really did like the focus on mental health, struggling to set boundries, and how much each little individual choice made up your character. It felt like it was about real people, not the pop version of what the '50s were like. I'm surprised they got all the gory and unglamorous depictions of WWII past the censors.

Nenya and I watched The Purple Plain, which was enjoyable on another level. It's a British WWII movie about a Canadian Mosquito pilot in Burma who is Sad Because of His Dead Wife, and Learns To Love Again. The plot was not all that, but it was reasonable in its depiction of the Burmese, and featured perspiration soaked and increasingly grubby Gregory Peck the Canadian, so I was well pleased. I was charmed that they'd obviously decided to hire him, knew he couldn't do a British accent, and therefore literally labeled him "CANADA" and called it done. (I have a weakness for RCAF Mosquito pilots as that's how my maternal grandfather spent the war, though not in Burma.)

Local Eats

Apr. 17th, 2017 02:40 pm
muccamukk: A pair feet wearing steel-toed boots. Text: "Have boots. Will travel." (Lights: Work Boots)
In reply to my comment about beachcombing a couple posts back, [personal profile] spiralsheep reminded me that gooseneck barnacles are super trendy eats right now, which also reminded me that I'd vaguely been meaning to try them. They grow abundantly all over the lower intertidal zone. Though they're a different species here than in Spain, they look pretty well the same.


(Click to enlarge, this picture taken on a different, rather nicer day. They're the white ones growing in the middle of the blue mussels.)

Then [personal profile] spiralsheep posted this: I'm now wondering whether the following description of how to eat a foodie must-try Spanish delicacy would put other people off as much as it does me? Or am I merely a finicky eater? Hold it by the foot at one end, peel back the scaly skin and pull out the rubbery inner tube, then remove the single claw before swallowing the tube.

Which admittedly does sound like something form Welcome to Night Vale.

But that's also the sort of thing that makes me go, "Hold my flower! Imma try this!"

So since we were going on a walk anyway, I picked a few on the way back. They were way easier to harvest than I would have thought. The scaly skin of the foot cut easily with a sharp pocket knife. I only got three in case I didn't like them. I doused my kerchief in a tidepool and wrapped them in it to keep them fresh.


I then boiled them for three minutes in brine with a bay leaf, a slice of onion and a slice of lemon, and then chilled them on ice.




Eating them was a bit trickier than described, as the scaly skin doesn't really peel back? But rather has to be picked off, but the "claw" pulled off very easily, leaving about two cm of muscle which is the eats bit. It was slightly chewy, but not at all gloopy like a raw oyster. The flavour was fresh, slightly salty and savoury, and similar to clam broth. Went well with lemon, but I think aioli would overwhelm it.

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Apr. 13th, 2017 02:27 pm
muccamukk: text 'Writers expressed themselves with cymbals' with a picture of a set of cymbals (Books: Writing)
I just found out that my Peggy/Angie story is included in Awesome Ladies Podfic Anthology.
I don't know if they missed telling other authors, so check the ToC and see if your stories are in there too! I see a couple names I know. (I have a blanket permission statement, but I do wish people would let me know so I can squee at them.)

Over at Jim C. Hines' blog: Sexism and Second Chances by Brianna Wu.
This is specific to the latest round of SF/F con mismanagement, but I think speaks to women in STEM and SF/F generally.

In Hakai Magazine: Pool-landia: For 70 years, Iceland has kept afloat the idea that mandatory swimming lessons save lives, but the policy doesn’t hold water by Egill Bjarnason
For those interested in oddly specific policy wank.

At [personal profile] hearts_blood's: Portrait of a young Gregory Peck before his entrance into Hollywood, 1942.

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