sparowe: (Casting Crowns)
[personal profile] sparowe
 

God’s Higher Purpose

 
Today's MP3

No moment, event, or detail falls outside of God’s supervision. God is the one who “causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous” (Matthew 5:45 NIV). He isn’t making up this plan as he goes along. Daniel 5:21 says, “The most High God rules the kingdom of men, and sets over it whom he will.”

So, if God is in charge, why does he permit challenges to come our way? Wouldn’t an almighty God prevent them? Not if they serve his higher purpose. The ultimate example is the death of Christ on the cross! Everyone thought the life of Jesus was over. Jesus was dead and buried, but God raised him from the dead. God took the crucifixion of Friday and turned it into the celebration of Sunday. Can he not do a reversal for you?

Read more Anxious for Nothing

For more inspirational messages please visit Max Lucado.

selenak: (rootbeer)
[personal profile] selenak
In short, hm. Could go either way.

Spoilers wonder when internal communication systems are going to be used )

Welcome: the Re-Welcoming

Sep. 26th, 2017 10:46 pm
morbane: pohutukawa blossom and leaves (Default)
[personal profile] morbane posting in [community profile] yuletide
This is an informal community for chat about Yuletide, which was started up by participants and has now (2017) been passed over to mods. Official announcements are given at [community profile] yuletide_admin and [livejournal.com profile] yuletide_admin (which has a feed at [syndicated profile] yuletide_admin_feed).

This is intended to be a Dreamwidth equivalent of [livejournal.com profile] yuletide.

Yuletide 2017 Tag Set OPEN

Sep. 26th, 2017 10:33 pm
morbane: uletide mod image of guinea pig among daisies (mod)
[personal profile] morbane posting in [community profile] yuletide_admin
The 2017 tag set is open! If you can’t load it because of demand, try this downloadable version of the page (3MB) instead.

Statistics! )

Corrections )

Challenges )

Saving the Ocean One Outfit at a Time

Sep. 26th, 2017 12:15 am
[syndicated profile] hakai_magazine_feed

Posted by Heather Pringle, Amorina Kingdon

The sea suffers for fashion. Kombucha leather and leased jeans to the rescue.

by Heather Pringle, Amorina Kingdon | 2,900 words

sovay: (Otachi: Pacific Rim)
[personal profile] sovay
Our house smells like the sea. A sea-fog came in through the windows before midnight, as strong and salt as standing on the docks: I was lying on the couch and thought that if I looked out the windows, I would see water moving under the streetlights, and first I got Jacques Brel's "La cathédrale" stuck in my head and then I fell asleep. I was saying elsewhere in a discussion of dead zones/waste lands in weird fiction that someone must have set a weird tale in the deep anoxic waters of the Black Sea because it's too uncanny an environment to pass up (the millennia of preserved shipwrecks alone), but I can't think of any examples. I hope I don't have to write one. See previous complaints about research.

Star Trek Discovery

Sep. 25th, 2017 10:43 pm
muccamukk: B'Elanna standing in front of lines of code. (ST: Engineering)
[personal profile] muccamukk
...

Maybe it'll ... get better?

[in the highway, in the hedges]

Sep. 25th, 2017 03:37 pm
watersword: "Shakespeare invaded Poland, thus perpetuating World Ware II." -Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Abridged. (Stock: Shakespeare invaded Poland.)
[personal profile] watersword
[insert groveling for not being interesting for like a month]

The world is on fire; Endellion was good-but-not-great; autumn in New York is almost as good as spring in New York; Chuck Schumer and his staff ignore their phones 100% of the time (Kirsten Gillibrand's staff is at least available sometimes, and my representative's staff ALWAYS talks to me); I made apple hand pies this weekend; the seminar I am taking is not as interesting as I was hoping but I will soldier on; the fact that no one has cut together the Elizabeth-Swann-relevant scenes from Pirates of the Caribbean 5 is an abomination; my office moved across campus and while there are some serious downsides, the fact that I no longer work in a dungeon is a net positive.

I cannot believe it is already almost Yom Kippur.

Star Trek: Discovery

Sep. 26th, 2017 12:21 am
ruuger: My hand with the nails painted red and black resting on the keyboard of my laptop (Default)
[personal profile] ruuger
Dear Americans who don't have that CBS streaming whatever thing: This is what avoiding spoilers for current TV is like for the rest of the world ;)

Anyway, I watched the first two episodes of the new Star Trek series, and my main thought about it was that it was...

cut for spoilers )

Other shows that I've recently watched include Lucifer (gave it two episodes, but it was too much of a generic procedural), and The Mist (also watched two episodes and came to the conclusion that it was terrible). I still need to watch the second season of Sense8 before I run out of Netflix, and I'll probably also at least check out Expanse and The OA.
[syndicated profile] seattlereviewofbooks_feed

This week's sponsor is the fabulous Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair, an annual event in which "the best bookstore in America" opens for two short days, puts the wonders of the world at your fingertips, and then vanishes — leaving nothing but a trace of bookdust.

This year's event is October 14th and 15th, at the Seattle Center's Exhibition Hall. Just $5 gets you entry on both days, with access to more than a hundred exhibitors from the United States, Canada, England, and Spain, sharing rarities, collectibles, and ephemera. You won't want to miss it.

Sponsors like the Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair make the Seattle Review of Books possible. Did you know we sold out our last sponsorship run? We're booked solid through the end of January, but if you have a book, event, or project you'd like to get in front of our readers, reach out and let us know. We'll be happy to crack open our calendars and reserve you ahead of the pack.

[syndicated profile] seattlereviewofbooks_feed

Many people have asked me what I thought about KUOW reporter Bill Radke's response to the uproar over their interview with the Nazi. I've seen his comments described as "heartfelt," and I guess that's true. He seemed to be very emotional over the whole thing, and he acknowledged that he made some mistakes.

But as I suggested on Thursday night, this isn't a matter of journalism. This is a bigger problem than Bill Radke. And my central concerns still haven't been addressed. Here are the two things that I believe it's essential for KUOW to do in order to regain my trust:

  1. KUOW must not give platforms to Nazis. I've seen some people suggest that this is a slippery slope, or an affront to the idea of free speech. Not so. I'm not suggesting that KUOW ban any conservative thinker I don't like, or anything like that. I'm saying when someone is a known supporter of Nazi causes — if they appear in photographs with Nazi paraphernalia — they do not deserve a platform. The swastika they wear stands for genocide and the end of civilization. They don't get to explain that ideology, or to recruit others to their cause. That's the clear bright line: if they have direct involvement with swastikas and Nazi ideology, they don't get a platform at all.

  2. When a person wears a swastika, they are explicitly encouraging violence against Jewish people, people of color, and LGBTQ citizens. Just as KUOW wouldn't air a death threat, they should not turn over their airwaves to people who want to murder minorities. KUOW should directly apologize to the specific groups who are threatened by Nazis and Nazi ideology.

That's it. Those are two fairly simple requests: don't give a platform to Nazis, and apologize to groups who they imperiled with their reckless coverage.

Some have questioned my call to stop giving money to KUOW until they make things right. So here's my thinking on that: KUOW has demonstrated that they are more than happy to transform listener commentary — negative tweets, phone calls, emails — into clickbait articles about the controversy. So listener complaints are worse than ineffectual — they're actually generating content and revenue for KUOW.

That leaves perhaps the loudest message that any media consumer can send: money. By telling KUOW that you're not going to give them any more money until they agree to not give platforms to Nazis and until they apologize to targeted groups for giving a platform to a Nazi, you are speaking in a language that station management understands. By not listening to KUOW or subscribing to their podcasts or clicking on their articles, you're letting their editors and social media experts know that you're not kidding around.

Besides, Seattle has another fantastic public radio station that has not given a platform to a Nazi. If you support KNKX with the money you would ordinarily use to support KUOW, you're still supporting local media. This is not a zero-sum game.

I want to be clear: this is not about Bill Radke. It's not about doxxing the Nazi that KUOW allowed to appear anonymously. This is not about any individual. This is about a standard that we as a society must agree to uphold: genocide is not up for debate. We will not allow the murder of minorities into the free market of ideas. We wholeheartedly reject the Nazi ideology, and we will not allow it into our public discourse.

Adjective noun.

Sep. 25th, 2017 08:30 pm
shallowness: Kira in civvies looking straight ahead (DS9 Kira Nerys)
[personal profile] shallowness
Gave Electric Dreams, The Impossible Planet a try. Out of the cut: stupid episode. Under the cut: spoilers and rationale. )

Marvel is Marvel 2017

Sep. 25th, 2017 12:36 pm
scribblemyname: (x-men)
[personal profile] scribblemyname posting in [community profile] yuletide



banner by broadbeam


The idea here is to organize a gift exchange designed for Marvel and its many branched runs, authors, related and unrelated fandoms. The idea is to include the X-Men side and the Avengers side and every other side that non-Marvel fans don't realize is Marvel. The idea is to include any timeline you want, any world you want, any character you want, so long as it's Marvel.

NOW OPEN FOR NOMINATIONS

Dreamwidth Community | LiveJournal Feed | 2017 AO3 Collection | 2017 Tagset


  • Nominations: Sunday, September 24 - Saturday, October 14

  • Sign Ups: Tuesday, October 17 - Sunday, October 29

  • Assignments Out: Monday, November 6

  • Works Due: Saturday, December 9

  • Works Revealed: Sunday, December 17

  • Authors Revealed: Sunday, December 24

Fandom Giftbox!

Sep. 25th, 2017 11:21 am
muccamukk: Boromir and Faramir grinning and hugging. (LotR: Squee!)
[personal profile] muccamukk
I'm super excited about what I got this year, because Wonder Woman icons! Two sets!

And then I got a wonderful ficlet from an AU where Boromir didn't die and how Aragorn's coronation then went. (movie verse, and very sweet).

AND THEN I got Murderbot fic! About Murderbot's favourite show getting cancelled, and Murderbot doing what any fan would do. It's a sweet and funny little follow up to All Systems Red and I'm so pleased with it.

I wrote three fic:

Sunday Tea on Mars
Babylon 5, post series, Catherine/Jeff/Michael/Lise, 1,800 words, Teen.
Lise knows she's been with Michael too long when a presumed-dead Minbari prophet at the breakfast table is the least of her worries.

My Dreams Under Your Feet
Star Wars: The Force Awakens, post movie, Leia/Poe, 2,100 words, Explicit.
Poe isn't sure he has it in him to give Leia everything she needs after the Battle of Starkiller Base, but he knows he's going to try.

In Your Arms Tonight
Star Wars: The Force Awakens, post movie, Finn/Poe, 1,100 words, Teen.
When Finn gets back, he's taking that wilderness survival training Poe keeps telling him about.
[syndicated profile] seattlereviewofbooks_feed

Franklin Foer’s World Without Mind is a must-read book of the fall season. Subtitled The Existential Threat of Big Tech, World is a full-frontal assault on the fallacious idea that the big four tech companies that shape our world — Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Apple — are benevolent firms that have the advancement of humanity in mind.

Foer smartly couches his polemic in memoir, relaying his experiences as a beloved editor of the New Republic. When the storied magazine was bought by a tech gadfly, its century-old dedication to the art of journalism and thoughtful opinion was discarded in favor of click-hungry content farming. Foer was fired, and the majority of his staff left with him in solidarity.

A lesser writer could seem like an aggrieved party in World, and Foer certainly does acknowledge that his pride was wounded in the aftermath of the New Republic’s Silicon Valley-styled meltdown. But instead he makes a compelling case for considered, intellectual thought in the public sphere, even as he rages against the slick digital robber barons who have consumed our attention in exchange for a few baubles of convenience.

Foer reads from World at Elliott Bay Book Company on Wednesday, September 27th at 7 pm. The event is free; no purchase is necessary. I hope you'll go hear him out. You’ll likely think a little differently about the urgings of the vibrating hunk of glass and steel in your pocket after the event.

What follows is a lightly edited transcript of a phone conversation I had with Foer last week.

I assume you heard the news that Amazon recently announced that they're looking to found a second separate-but-equal headquarters in another city?

Yes.

Now we're watching cities bow and scrape in the hopes of bringing Amazon to them. Tucson just sent a giant cactus to Amazon management, like some sort of a weird dowry or something. I was wondering if you had any advice for cities that might be trying to entice Amazon to set up in their city?

Let's just look at Amazon's track record when it comes to exploiting civil government. Part of its business model has been to fleece local municipalities — with its refusal to pay sales tax over time, or all the concessions that it extracts when it goes about setting a warehouse down.

I think the right metaphor is the sports stadiums that get built in cities, where owners come in and exploit civic pride and sense of civic purpose in order to get these fantastical deals for themselves, where cities empty their coffers in order to build these monumental facilities that teams then make money off of.

I just think it's sad. And part of the sadness is that we can see where this is going over the long run, which is that Amazon may bring jobs in the short term, but they really don't want those jobs over the long run. In the long run, when Amazon puts down a warehouse, it's going to automate it, so there are not going to be workers.

I wonder whether these cities are doing anything to remotely try to calculate the long-term economic benefit for themselves. I doubt it.

One of the things that I thought was especially interesting in this book was the writing about media, especially the parts that focused on your own experience. I left a publication soon after management installed [analytics software] Chartbeat because they devalued arts coverage after they learned that it wasn't as popular as they had assumed it was.

I've done a lot of thinking since then that maybe the original sin for the marriage between media and the internet was the decision by Google founders that a click on an ad was only worth a fraction of a cent. It's a system that doesn't allow for the fact that some clicks could be worth more to some advertisers than to others. It's very rigid. Do you think there's a way to change that discussion — to revalue the importance of writing as valued by advertising — or is the advertising model basically dead for media?

My sense is that the advertising model is kind of dead in the short term. I fundamentally agree with you that Google has deflated the advertising market as it exists now beyond any reasonable significance to media companies. We need to move on to something different.

My preference is to move to a subscription model, but I also think that it's possible that there's some form of advertising that hasn't been invented yet that could be more valuable than display advertising, and less corrupting than the native advertising that we've seen people moving towards over time. But I'm not smart enough to know what that is.

Do you think anyone's getting close to it? Do you see anybody doing things that you like?

What I like is the resurgence of subscription models. I like that the New York Times and the Washington Post seem to be selling subscriptions in some volume, re-acclimating people to the idea of having to pay for what they read.

But I also think that the subscription model as it exists now for digital journalism isn’t valuable on its own because the prices are set far too low. We're kind of in this place where everything has been deflated. The value of digital advertising has been deflated, the value of digital subscriptions has been deflated, and it's hard to see where exactly the fast-forward is.

One thing that I do think -

Sorry that I don't have the cheerful, optimistic solution for you.

It's okay. Nobody has those solutions, that's the thing. That's why it's important to keep thinking about it. But one thing that I do think the internet has done really well — and I don't know if it gets a lot of credit from people in the media on this — is to provide a platform for people who have never before had voices in the media.

Yes.

I find it really difficult to argue for a return to the old gatekeeper model when there's now more representation in culture than ever before. Is there a way to reclaim institutional thought and consideration while still maintaining the representational progress we've seen in the last 10 years?

Yeah. That doesn't seem terribly difficult to me. I think that institutional journalism has responded to the internet, and also a shift in times, by being much more representative. I think that when it comes to a lot of these questions about new technology and old media, it's easy to slip into Manichean thought. The choice isn't between going back to the old media of the 1980s — which was stodgy, excessively white male, etc. — versus the status quo. I think we have the ability to do better on all fronts. I don't think that we need to abandon all the good aspects of change in order to respond to the bad aspects of change.

As you were collecting ideas for this book, where did you draw the line between reality and conspiracy theory, and between apathy and malevolence in the intent of these companies? It's very easy for me to get too wrapped up in this sort of good guy/bad guy paradigm, when the truth of their intent is much more complex. Is this something you've had to think about as you’ve put this book together? This is kind of a vague question and I'm very sorry — can you retrieve anything of value out of that?

I think you're saying that it's possible to look at what the tech companies do and come to the conclusion that they're highly malevolent, when in fact they may have a lot of ideas that could be caricatured as malevolent, but in fact are relatively benign. Is that what you're saying?

Yeah. That's a good, solid place to start for sure.

I would say that what makes these companies interesting is that they're idealistic and ambitious. I think one does need to take seriously their own self-description. I think that we need to treat them as not just money-making corporations, but treat them also as companies that have ambitions to change the world. Sometimes they're self-justifying ambitions. I think that [Facebook founder Mark] Zuckerberg does a lot of self-justifying, but in other instances I think that they're perfectly sincere in describing how they want to change the world.

[Calling it] a conspiracy makes it sound like people are sitting in a back room somewhere in Palo Alto devising a hidden plan. My point is that the plan isn't actually very hidden. I think that a lot of times these companies, for the most part, are very naked in describing what they're up to, so I don't really think it takes a whole lot of reading to go to the place I go when I'm describing them.

Do you worry when you put this book out that there's a chance that you might be pigeonholed in the role of the curmudgeon — like, CNN will call you to fill out a panel whenever they need someone to just complain about Big Tech?

Yeah, I've clearly cast myself as grandpa. I don't understand why that's a worry. Am I worried that I'm a token, is that what you’re asking?

The media tends to find value in people who say “no,” but they value them only if they say “no” in the same way again and again. I wonder if there's a possibility of you being typecast as the man who said “no.”

I feel like I'm just writing my opinion. Really I wasn't thinking about being on a CNN panel when I was writing about this book. I want my argument to be heard, so I'd probably go on a CNN panel, but really I live to write books and arguments, not to be on CNN panels, so that's what I think about most.

Do I worry about getting typecast as a curmudgeon? If that's your question, I clearly don't really worry about that because I wrote a book that can easily be described as curmudgeonly.

What has the response been like at your events? Is there anything that you think that people can expect coming out to your reading in Seattle?

One of the interesting things in the moment that we've arrived at is there's this concept that's become cliché in describing our politics, which is this concept of the Overton Window, which is when the discourse expands to include ideas that resided outside of the mainstream.

When I started working on this book, I felt like people looked at me weirdly, and they couldn't understand why I was going to be criticizing these companies in technology that people have so much affection for.

Over the last couple months, I happened to make an argument that lined up with a shift in thinking. In large part, I think the election started to change people's minds about Facebook, and then Amazon's purchase of Whole Foods elicited a lot of anxiety about Amazon's size, and etc.

One of the fascinating things is that there are a lot of people who I thought would hate my argument. I've just been surprised at the people who are either centrist or in finance — or even in Silicon Valley — who seem sympathetic to my argument. It feels like I thought I was going to be throwing a stone at the Overton Window, but instead, it feels like I'm just climbing through the Overton Window just as it's opening.

ruuger: My hand with the nails painted red and black resting on the keyboard of my laptop (Default)
[personal profile] ruuger
The anon period at Remix Revival has ended, so I can now reveal that my creation for the remix was "Introducing Mr. and Mrs. Flint-Vastra (The Carte de visite remix) ", a piece of fanart about Jenny and Vastra from Doctor Who.

I had a few fic ideas as well, but Real Life continues to conspire against me, and I ended up doing fanart instead. It was fun, though, since it's been a while since I've made manips.

(I also took this as an excuse to finally start posting my old manips to AO3)

In return I received Scout's Honor, a lovely remix of one of my The Mentalist fics.

I also received three delightful fics from [community profile] fandomgiftbox: Smiles (The Mentalist, Jane/Cho), feel the beat from the tambourine (Doctor Who, Doctor & Bill) and an untitled ficlet (Doctor Who, Doctor & Bill)
paynesgrey: Lilith and Eve (lilitheve)
[personal profile] paynesgrey posting in [community profile] girlgay
Title: The Sinner and the Serpent (10 works so far)
Author: HKrowe/Paynesgrey
Summary: Lilith was once Adam's first wife, but history has a way of forgetting her. What history also forgot, is her obsession with Adam's second wife, and how her lust drove Eve to commit her biggest sin. A Collection of poems and short stories.
Pairings: Lilith/Eve
Main Characters: Eve, Lilith, God, Adam
Rating: Adult
Warnings: adult themes for sex, violence, heresy
Spoilers: None
Disclaimer: I do not own the Goddess Lilith, but I love to write about her for sure.
Author's Notes: This is an ongoing serialization of the relationship between Lilith and Eve from the Judeo-Christian Bible, but focused as an original myth/fairytale.

Links: @AO3 | @wattpad

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