muccamukk: General Organa looking up. (SW: The General)
Title: A Pause Between Bullet Points
Fandom: Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Rating: Teen
Word Count: 600
Notes: Written for [community profile] ladiesbingo square: Character Death (referring here to Han).
Summary: Leia is busy; Rey needs advice.

Totally not written for another fest before I realised it hit a couple big DNWs, nope.
muccamukk: Gregory Peck looks up from the book he's reading. (Books: Hello Reading)
I've decided that Murderbot from All Systems Red is my patronus. I'm just a super-cranky robot with a media addiction, people.

Liked by don't have any particular comment on Doctor Who 10x04. I do wonder if Susan is to show up, the "grandfather" thing seems to underline her story. I think I was right about last week's vault guess.


We rewatched Spellbound, which I still love, based almost entirely on aesthetics. I'm convinced that the movie was made because Selznick had the rights to the book, but no one was terribly interested in actually reading the book, and then Selznick wanted to include Freudian analysis, but Hitchcock had zero interest in that, except to say, "Oh, hey, symbolism. Let's hire Dali. He likes symbolism," then made up a bunch of total bullshit based on Selznick rambling on about his therapy sessions. Apparently they had a psychiatry consultant, but I strongly suspect no one listened to her. (I admit that, on a personal level, this gives me a small amount of vindictive glee. I have an inherited dislike of Freudian analysis (my paternal grandfather was in that line of work, and saying that it did that side of the family no good whatsoever would be putting it really fucking mildly), and seeing it cheerfully trampled pleases me.)

But honestly, the main point of this movie, and almost certainly why it was a hit, is because Gregory Peck is in peak Wounded Gazelle mode, and spends most of the movie looking like this:

Saying things like, "I'm not worth loving!" and fainting dramatically.

Meanwhile, Ingrid Bergman takes charge, stalwartly solves all the mysteries while shepherding him around, dodging the police, and looking like this:

Saying things like, "Pull yourself together!" and petting his hair while he's unconscious.

That's all I'm here for, people.

(Meanwhile, Nenya has a rant about rogue queer theory and people being Wrong On the Internet: Constance Peterson Defense Squad)


We also watched Captain Newman, M.D., which more or less has the premise that Gregory Peck from 1963 treats Gregory Peck from 1949, and cracked me up on those grounds. (In 1949, Peck played Frank Savage in Twelve O'Clock High, a bomber group commander who pushed himself and all his men to mental exhaustion and then pushed them all right over the edge. In '63 he played Dr. Joe Newman, a psychiatrist treating Army Air Corpmen, largely from the bomber command, suffering from various psychological ailments.) It was on the whole a rather sweet drama/comedy, which mostly pulled its humour from army shenanigans, and not from making fun of the mentally ill. Reminded me a bit of M*A*S*H the TV series for style of humour.
muccamukk: Gregory Peck looks up from the book he's reading. (Books: Hello Reading)
Long promised, finally made.

Notes on methodology (haha):
  • I watched twenty three movies for this project.

  • Movie selection was based on what I felt like watching based on summaries and whim of the moment.

  • The chart includes almost all of Peck's early career, and almost nothing following 1962. There are next to no Westerns.

  • Inclusion on this flowchart is because I watched the movie, not because I thought it was good, though hopefully the choices give some idea of content. Other Movies tag has reviews of most of these.

  • This chart was getting out of hand, so I split it into three parts based on aesthetic, as follows:

    • Wounded Gazelle: The entirety of his career between 1944 and 1949, when he was coasting on a good deal of earnestness and not a whole lot of acting talent. (Excludes one movie because life is too short for Ernest Hemingway.)

    • Big Damn Hero: Mostly war or military movies, mostly filmed in the 1950s.

    • Hot Dad: What it says on the tin.

  • Some movies are repeated across sections. A movie appearing twice just means it fits both, not that I rec it twice as much.

  • The list assumes that you find Gregory Peck attractive and charming, and are more or less watching movies based on that fact.

  • Made on OpenOffice Draw. I am, clearly, not greatly experienced in graphic design.

Flowchart behind cut )

(Also on tumblr)
muccamukk: Milady with her chin on her hand, looking pensive. (Musketeers: Thinking)
I'd been avoiding this one because the plot (Gregory Peck pretends to be Jewish in order to write a magazine series on anti-Semitism) sounded unbelievably cheesy and liable to trigger my embarrassment squick so hard that I would be forced to fling myself into the bay. Having been assured that it's "Not totally cringeworthy" and also been lured in by Dean Stockwell (who also played Peck's son in Valley of Decision for 2.5 scenes, but wasn't credited, and I didn't recognise him), plus it being in the middle of Peck's wounded gazelle phase, Nenya and I decided to give it a go.

It wasn't totally cringeworthy. Though I did watch the first part while slightly high, which may have helped. (Peck: I even know the title, "I was Jewish for six months!" Me: I am not NEARLY high enough for this.)

I've been thinking a lot about what it was trying to do, what it managed to do, and what all that looked like seventy years later. Rambly feelings, spoilers, Christian's opinions on movie about anti-Semitism, long. )
muccamukk: A basket with a seal in it. Text: WTF!? (Politics: Phoque (WTF!?))
Enjoyed Doctor Who 10x02 "Smile." Though it's one of those situations where it's best just to coast on the banter and not really think too hard about the plot. It was one heck of a gorgeous episode in any case, and I do need a Bill icon from it. I'm still loving Bill's practicality and this slightly lighter, bouncier Twelve. Long may it last. They're having fun with not telling about the mystery so far, too (it's Gallifrey). Looking forward to next week.


Nenya and I watched Yellow Sky, which was a competent western staring Gregory Peck and Anne Baxter. It was only slightly rapey and a little bit racist, and had some nice cinematography, so I'm calling it okay for a Western.

We then watched Lust in the Dust Duel in the Sun, which I expected to be basically the same but in technicolor, and boy was it not.

To understand this movie, you have to picture this: The year is 1945, and our hero lies alone in a Florida swamp. He has spent months playing the happiest homesteader in history, despite the fact that his costars are 126 deer, 9 black bears, 37 dogs, 17 buzzards, 1 owl, 83 chickens, 36 pigs, 8 rattlesnakes, 18 squirrels, 4 horses, 17 raccoons and the world's most annoying child actor. Also Jane Wyman. He's not allowed to make out with Jane Wyman. It's a family picture, so the most he can do is put his arm around her shoulders, stare into the matte-painted sunrise, and say things like, "Golly, the Lord sure made a mighty fine day to plant corn on, ain't He?" (The director made them cut the "golly.") In between swatting mosquitoes, our hero writes to the man currently holding his contract. "Dear Mr. Selznick, Next time, please cast me in the opposite of this. Third billing is fine. Yours ever, Gregory."

Let it never be said that David O. Selznick didn't come through on that one! Below there be spoilers, and screenshots (including a regrettablely small amount of shirtlessness, and a regrettablely large amount of brownface). )
muccamukk: General Organa looking up. (SW: The General)
Title: Undiminished (The Planets and Islands Remix)
Remix of: No Man is an Island (the Drowned World remix) by actonbell
Author: [personal profile] muccamukk
Fandom: Star Wars (Mostly OT and TFA)
Rating: Teen
Word Count: 2,100
Notes: Written for [community profile] starwarsrollingremix, reveals here.
Summary: Five times Leia Organa left home, and built a new one.

I strongly rec basically every other fic in this collection, but especially the Rogue Squadron chain, which does some very cool stuff with mythology. Oh, and the rest of my chain, which is amazing. POE!


Links:
[personal profile] fuesch has made Doctor Who icons from all eras, including some non-spoilery ones of Bill and Bill&12.

(Via [personal profile] kjata) Men Recommend David Foster Wallace to Me by Deirdre Coyle.

(Via [personal profile] marthawells) Issue one of Anathema Magazine is out. Anathema: Spec from the Margins is a free, online tri-annual magazine publishing speculative fiction (SF/F/H, the weird, slipstream, surrealism, fabulism, and more) by queer people of colour on every range of the LGBTQIA spectrum. I subscribed for a year.

Save the Unicorn Humble Book Bundle.

Volunteers, Professionals, and Who Gets to Have Fun at Cons by Michi Trota.
muccamukk: Close up of Rey wearing a beat up X-Wing pilot's helmet and looking up at the sky. (SW: Dream of Stars)
When the Star Wars: The Last Jedi teaser dropped, I watched it three times and then woke Nenya up and made her watch it. Nenya: That... doesn't really show anything new. Me: *wanders around cheerfully humming Binary Sunset theme for next two days.* Apparently I'm easy.

"Carrie Fisher Was a Script Doctor For Star Wars: The Last Jedi"

Star Wars - The Force Awakens - Rey's Theme - Violin vs. Machine cover.

Most of you know now I have a mixed relationship with Moffat's run, which has followed my mixed relationship with RTD's run. I watched the last two Christmas specials, liked the River one, was kinda meh on the super hero one, hadn't watched the last series with Clara because the previous series with Clara pissed me off so badly. I love Capaldi generally, but found that Twelve wasn't really my Doctor (though he was more my Doctor than Matt Smith, admittedly). I liked Clara, but her plots often made me want to set my hair on fire, so I bailed for a bit.

Doctor Who 10x01: "The Pilot." OMG! I LOVED THIS EPISODE! I love Bill. I love her relationship with what seems to be a kinder, lighter Twelve. I like Nardol and how he seems to be the one proping up the Doctor, rather than the companion doing all the emotional h/c stuff. Spoilers )

Apparently Kris Marshall is the odds on favourite for the new Doctor. Please no.

I watched Cape Fear, or rather I watched the bits of Cape Fear that weren't showing women being terrorised. It was a short movie.

Nenya and I watched The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, which we both really liked. There have been a million movies about white suburban malaise in the 1950s, and I guess this was one of the first. I really did like the focus on mental health, struggling to set boundries, and how much each little individual choice made up your character. It felt like it was about real people, not the pop version of what the '50s were like. I'm surprised they got all the gory and unglamorous depictions of WWII past the censors.

Nenya and I watched The Purple Plain, which was enjoyable on another level. It's a British WWII movie about a Canadian Mosquito pilot in Burma who is Sad Because of His Dead Wife, and Learns To Love Again. The plot was not all that, but it was reasonable in its depiction of the Burmese, and featured perspiration soaked and increasingly grubby Gregory Peck the Canadian, so I was well pleased. I was charmed that they'd obviously decided to hire him, knew he couldn't do a British accent, and therefore literally labeled him "CANADA" and called it done. (I have a weakness for RCAF Mosquito pilots as that's how my maternal grandfather spent the war, though not in Burma.)
muccamukk: Porthos laughing victoriously. (Musketeers: I Win!)
(no the other rewatch)

As Nenya pointed out in her picture post, yesterday was Mr. Gregory Peck's 101st birthday.

Since Guns of Navarone, we have watched Keys of the Kingdom where 28-year-old GP is a Catholic priest who goes to China and basically fails to convert anyone who wasn't already Christian and spends half his time hanging out with the Methodists, but does woobie well. He does this thing where he's just decent to everyone and respects them, and therefore is liked, even though he himself thinks he's terrible. It's extremely attractive. There is no fic.

We rewatched Roman Holiday which neither of us had seen in ages (and Nenya possibly not with subtitles), which is not my favourite GP role, but does have a lot of Audrey Hepburn being stunning, so there is that. Also not usually huge on size kink, but I'm pretty sure he could cup his hands around her waist, and gives good hugs. Plus he spends the last ten minutes trying not to cry and not doing very well at that, so decent woobie. There's a handful of fic, but nothing notable.

I watched his first movie Days of Glory which was fascinating for being a middle-budget Hollywood war propaganda movie that was fervently pro-Soviet (hey, remember when we were all on the same side?) It's worth copying the first few lines of the opening narration here for a flavour of it. (Plus I spent like six hours last night coding subtitles so that Nenya could watch a few scenes, so I have it to hand!)
Here is the true story, which could have happened in any land, of a little group of free people who lived and loved and fought to drive the invaders from their native soil. One of the countless thousands of those guerrilla bands who from secret hiding places in the swamps and in the great forest lived days of imperishable glory. Their leader had been left behind by the army especially to organise them: Vladimir (as played by Mr. Gregory Peck, distinguished star of the New York stage).

Anyway, GP plays an engineer who became a partisan and has angst about his life now being just destroying things. Tamara Toumanova plays a ballerina who got stuck behind enemy lines on a USO (or whatever the Russian USO was) tour gone wrong. The dialogue is cheesy as hell, but the romance has good chemistry, and it's hard to remain uncharmed by something so deeply earnest (though GP says, "There is an old saying, 'bullets spare those who are in love,'" and promptly gets run over by a flaming tank, which was hard not to find unintentionally humorous). There is no fic.
muccamukk: Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson walking arm in arm. Text: "We strolled about together." (SH: Strolling)
I buzzed through the Guns of Navarone the book yesterday (skimming for dialogue and slashy introspection, mostly skiping the fight scenes) and it was regrettablely not as enjoyable as the movie. I mostly just don't like that style of adventure novel, and found the dialogue quite clunky. Interestingly Mallory was more openly emotional, and he and Andrea were quite a bit closer and more overtly slashy (though the I'll likely kill you in the morning plot was gone). All two of the female characters weren't there. The two-three other slash ships weren't shippy at all.

So like I mostly want fic for the movie, and there's exactly zero. [personal profile] giglet did a couple movie/book fusion things, which I liked, but there is no straight up movie fic where say Andrea finds Mallory after the war or we find out what happens to Roy. Boo.

I tried to make Nenya watch Going My Way, but she demanded Gregory Peck and would not accept Bing Crosby as a substitute. Which is fair, I guess.

Really pretty day today, so I mowed the lawns for the first time. Nice to see the sun.
muccamukk: Lt Bush salutes ironically. (HH: Salute)
What I Just Finished Reading
Obsessive Genius: The Inner World of Marie Curie (Great Discoveries Series) by Barbara Goldsmith
This series seems to be short summaries of people's achievements, but even given that I really liked this book. It didn't have room to get very technical or go into great detail on any given era, but was well written, interesting and didn't idolise its subject.


The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the Scientific Revolution by Deborah E. Harkness, narrated by Kate Reading
This is going to be one of those books that makes me annoyed at a lot of other books. I've read a fair bit about the scientific revolution, and this is all completely new to me to the extent that I'm now irritated at all the other books I've read for not including any of it.

It's a wonderful exploration of scientific culture in the late 16th-century, including pushes to increase mathematical literacy for national economic development, collecting-comparing-publishing findings from experiments, in fights over priority and credit, and government support of large-scale scientific projects, mostly focusing on how individual practitioners fit into all this. The idea that this was all going on, and that Francis Bacon (who the author dislikes!) was more or less whining because he didn't get to be in charge of it and gentlemen shouldn't get their hands dirty doing actual work, was frankly a little mind blowing.

Really good, very enjoyably read by Kate Reading, would recommend.


Desire Wears Diamonds (Jaded Gentleman #6) by Renee Bernard
So I haven't read anything else in this series, but clearly stumbled on the best one anyway. The author sets up the intro pretty well, and then I just spent the whole book drawing hearts around Michael and Grace, so who cares about the big arc plot (other than Michael is angst about it! Oh noes!) Michael just wants to atone by dying for his friends! But then he might have to die for his wife! And he can't do both at once! It's a challenge! Grace just wants a room of one's own.

I'm not sure if I'll back read, since idk if Michael will be in them enough, and I wasn't as invested in any of the others. Will keep an eye out for Bernard stuff though.


Four Wars of 1812 by D. Peter Macleod
I think this must have made a very fine museum exhibit, but in terms of trying to get a handle on the war, it just didn't have enough information in it. The art and pictures from the display were very interesting though, and I always appreciate an O'Brian reference.

(Speaking of [as the book also mentioned Forester], just watched Captain Horatio Hornblower, RN with Nenya, since I'd seen it ten years ago, and she hadn't at all. To conclude: "Ioan Gruffudd grew up to be Gregory Peck. Bush got less gay and slightly less hot. But it works amazingly well in continuity.")


Tropical Tiger Spy (Shifting Sands Resort #1) by Zoe Chant
Fun read. It was a bit slow to start, but once the action plot kicked off, I really enjoyed it. I liked how resourceful Amber was, though Tony's agency should seriously hire her, because she's way better at spy stuff. The action (and the "action") was very well written. Could have used a little more angst.

Tropical Wounded Wolf (Shifting Sands Resort #2) by Zoe Chant
Oh there we go. THAT one is angsty enough. Enjoyed it even more than the first one (because angst!), though the plot itself was a little slower. However, I appreciate trapped in peril plots, and both characters were very likeable. I'm curious what's going on with the resort though, so I hope Zoe writes more of these. Oh and the gazelle. Really great setting for a series.

(I was saying to Nenya, having just read Diamonds and Wounded Wolf back to back, is that the fantasy with heroes with massive self-esteem issues doesn't seem to be that you'll find someone who will tell you you're good, but that someone will tell you you're good, and you'll believe them.)


Pirates of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean by Adrian Tinniswood, narrated by Clive Chafer
Okay, look, I came into this researching English relations with pirates in the 1600s, which is what this book is about, and had the information I needed, and the Anglo-centrism STILL annoyed the crap out of me. I know that the author's area of study is England, but 100% of his sources are English, and he appears to have put zero effort into finding contemporary sources from any of the actual pirates or people who lived near them (unless they happened to be English), or anyone other than the odd note from the Venetian Ambassador to London , which leaves this book MASSIVELY one sided.

There's a lot of acknowledgement that okay, yeah, the English perspective is happening here, and that's not the whole story, and pointing out how the English were wrong about things, but very little quotes from primary sources from any other country. And we're talking Ottoman Empire here, so it's not like this stuff doesn't exist, they LOVED records.

So a lot of the information was interest, but the whole book was incredibly frustrating.


What I'm Reading Now
Audio: My Mother's Wars by Lillian Faderman about Faderman's mom living in NYC in the '20s to '40s. It's very engaging so far, though I just started it.

Library: Tecumseh and Brock: The War of 1812 by James Laxer, which I'm about 100 pages into and the war hasn't started yet. It's well written but also super depressing because genocide.


What I'm Reading Next
I have the next Selection book as a library e-book, so I'll probably buzz through that. I'm not sure for audio. Maybe that new romance novel about US Civil War spies.
muccamukk: Ray and Mick sitting in a car, not looking at each other. Text: Feelings? Yes. (LoT: Feelings?)
Happy Thanksgiving to US folks. Hang in there, eh?

Watched Spotlight by myself, and thought it was very good, well written and acted, and let the story speak rather than over dramatising everything. It was already very dramatic! It was about a story I remember hearing about, but didn't remember the details of, so educational as well. Nice to see McAdams in a serious role.

Watched the first Blade movie with Nenya, which I don't actually think I'd seen all of before. Hey, remember when Marvel movies starred black actors and were violently anti-authoritarian? (I'm actually mildly shocked at how anti-police stuff could be in the '90s). Enjoyable, but bloody. Will probably check out the sequels at some point. I remember Trinity having a fandom.

Rewatched Star Wars: TFA with Nenya, which is still like Basket of Kittens: The Movie.

Still loving Class, still don't have much to say about it, though I'm sad there's only two more episodes. I hope it gets another series. It's the first time in a while I've really loved a Doctor Who property.

Finding both by DC shows a bit frustrating. I liked the '80s episode of LoT, especially the subplot with Todd which fleshed Amaya out a bit, but I'm seriously allergic to Westerns, and wanted to set that episode on fire, except maybe the Captain Sara stuff. It was really out of continuity for Mick, and just... Westerns. Ugh. *wanders off muttering about genocide*

Over on Supergirl, I'm loving the Alex plot, liking the J'onn plot, but feeling irritated with most everything else. Spoilers up to 207. )

Quick Rec

Aug. 20th, 2016 08:42 am
muccamukk: Stacker and Mako evaluating candidates. (Pac Rim: Grading)
Everyone should go look at this absolutely amazing art of Stacker and Mako. Like right now.

Jeager by anon.

I haven't really had much time to poke through the Seeing Colour archive, any recs?
muccamukk: Stacker and Mako evaluating candidates. (Pac Rim: Grading)
Title: See Me Stopping Here (a remix from away)
Remixed from: And Miles To Go Before I Sleep by
Author: [personal profile] muccamukk
Fandom: Pacific Rim (Tamsin & Stacker, Mako)
Rating: Teen
Word Count: 1,200
Notes: Written for FemmeRemix. Best viewed in browser, for various formatting effects.
Summary: Luna made Tamsin promise to look after her brother. Tamsin doesn't plan to let death stop her from doing just that.

Also I guessed the authors on everything but the LotR one, which is probably because it's always the same three people in Babylon 5 fandom, and that one person always writes my favourite stuff in any fandom.
muccamukk: Dot and Phryne looking at each other and smiling, pretty hats. (MFMM: Companions)
Forgot this last week, but I'd been doing fic deadlines and hadn't read much anyway. I'm including this week a couple books I read as research for [community profile] ssrconfidential, but didn't post at the time because I'm Trying To Get Better At Being Anon.

What I Just Finished Reading
Finally gave up on The Kindness of Enemies by Leila Aboulela, which just wasn't working for me. Back to the library it goes.

I reread all of Marvel Adventures: Iron Man and Marvel Adventures: Avengers, which is still my fandom happy place, especially MA:A. I hadn't read MA:IM in long enough that'd I'd forgotten how it has my favourite Dr. Yinsin of all time. You know, the one who never likes Tony, and builds his own suit, and dies to protect his country. But then it harshed my squee by having a frankly pretty racist Mandarin plot (aren't they all?), and a lot of bad science (obviously reading the wrong genre), and Pepper being not awesome (though that smoothed out later in). It rallied when we hit a hilariously awful Howard Stark, who would win the Howard Is a Dick contest if not for all the other versions of Howard.


Long Red Hair by Meags Fitzgerald
I liked a lot of the ties between women here, the playfellows and adult friendships. I also liked that the book was sex positive even while the main character shaded a little grey (to my eyes). Her relationship with her parents was also cool.

The discussions of identity and shapes the main character toyed with (bisexual, celibate, feminine) and took on were well integrated, and didn't feel like lectures. The title red hair motif worked well.

I didn't get a lot out of the art, and because a lot of the characters were similarly-aged white women or girls, and the main character changed her hair constantly, I found myself confused as to who was who a lot of the time. I also wonder if I might have gotten more out of it having read the first one first.


The Irregulars: Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington by Jennet Conant, narrated by Simon Prebble
I feel like the author kept trying to fit in the larger social and political context, but mostly just got side tracked a lot. I would have liked a lot more BSC and a lot less DC gossip (though I realise there was a good deal of overlap). Though perhaps the problem is largely that Dahl's involvement in the BSC was not that interesting, and he and his cohort tended to be jerks, especially to women.

The book wasn't badly written on a prose level, and had several interesting stories and characters, but as a whole it didn't seem to be that coherent. I kept running into the edge of things that would probably be more interesting on their own, but weren't covered in any depth here.


Artifice by Alex Woolfson, art by Winona Nelson
From the Pride humble bundle.

This was really well done. I was genuinely worried about the outcome and totally rooting for the characters. I admit that bb gay boys in love despite the hellish corporate overlords is pretty well what I want to read all the time.

In fine tradition of tropey gay romances, the consent issues were... a little blurry, but I felt like it worked out pretty well on the whole. The romance was mostly very sweet and authentic, underlined by very lovely art. I also liked all the extras at the back.


Jews Without Money by Michael Gold
Really enjoyed this. There's not really a plot, but the cast of characters and scenes are vivid and interesting. I really liked Gold's animated language and intensity. For all its gloomy subject matter, it's very funny, and largely avoid cliché.

Unfortunately, the digital edition I had seemed to be missing some sections. Still worth a read though.

(I think my favourite review of this book said, in its entirety, "No wonder the author was a socialist!" Though interesting better than half the reviews are in Arabic, so I guess it's very popular in the middle east right now?)


The Hoods by Harry Grey
Oddly compelling and sometimes funny, but on the whole I read it quickly to get it over with.

I think this would have been a better book had there been some distance between the author and the narrator (rather than a man essentially writing about himself). As it was, we got a lot of self-aggrandizement, and very little reflection, and I was left with the feeling that almost everyone in the book was a psychopath. His constant refrain that everyone else was illegit, and therefore it was fine that he was a thief and a murderer wore pretty thin, and the prose itself wasn't good enough to make up for all that smugness. And nothing in the world would be enough to make up for all that homophobia and misogyny, or the rape attempt by the main character.

I'm interested to see if the movie falls for the glorification, or does something deeper with it.

(So then I watched the movie and... that was a cultural experience, so it was. I mean, I think it did undercut the glorification by making Our Hero even less sympathetic (completed rape instead of attempted, for example), and by cutting out a lot of the self-congratulation. It also cut almost all of the homophobia and made the women way more interesting, especially Carol was no longer the evil poly kinkster who drove a good man to ruin, but an actual person with opinions and shit. Which was nice. I was watching the standard director's cut, but not the super long one, incidentally. It was really long! Also, it cut almost all of the book except for the first few chapters and the last few chapters (which were the strongest parts anyway) and made up its own plot and pacing, which would have worked, except the interwoven future plot was just so completely bananapants that I firmly believe it was indeed an opium dream. Finally, young Robert was rather pretty, but young Elizabeth was STUNNING.)


What I'm Reading Now
Balm by Dolen Perkins-Valdez, which is set in Chicago just after the civil war. Just getting into it, but the characters are very interesting.


What I'm Reading Next
I want to do some research for [community profile] femmeremix so probably that.

Electra is next on my library list. I don't have an audiobook on the go yet, and am considering my options.


Oh, so movies, since I'm doing reviews of things. Nenya and I watched Spy which we loved and thought was the best. We also rewatched Michael Collins which had Liam Neeson yelling at people, so I was happy, also being slashy with young!Aidan Quinn, though the love triangle was silly. Also historical accuracy, not so much with this film. Anyway, Liam Neeson!

We also watched a pretty decent cam rip of Captain America: Civil War, which is certainly a movie that exists. Or four or five movies jammed into one movie, one of those. Please count me as the only person on earth who genuinely liked AoU, including the het ships, and mostly felt annoyed by CW. I did like T'Challa, but mostly wanted more Wanda and Sam, and less... everyone else, especially everyone else being a stupid jerk. The big battle was a fun use of powers, I guess? Maybe I've just expended all the Civil War feelings I'm ever going to have.
muccamukk: Steve laughing into his hand. (Avengers: Amused Steve)
Title: Of Iron and Fire
Author: [archiveofourown.org profile] jedibuttercup
Fandom: The Last Witch Hunter/Fast and the Furious Series
Characters: Chloe, Dom, Kaulder, Brian
Words: 2,400
Rating: Teen
Summary: "Who the hell are you?" the Kaulder-alike asked as Chloe crossed the street, hands open and eyes wide to emphasize that she wasn't using any magic.
Notes: Super cute crossover that adds a nice bit of worldbuilding.

Title: California Dreaming
Author: [personal profile] sholio
Fandom: Agent Carter
Characters: Angie, Peggy/Daniel, the rest of the gang
Words: 2,200
Rating: G
Summary: Angie comes out to see Peggy in California, and runs headlong into the weirdness of life at Stark Manor.
Notes: Hilarious post series fic, highlighting what a zoo Peggy's social life currently is. Nice to see Angie again, too. Author is still taking More prompts&fills here.
muccamukk: Sinbad looks up with an innocent and concerned expression (Sinbad: Puppy Eyes)
Title: Target Practice. Or, Missing the Mark
Author: [personal profile] muccamukk
Prompt: Finn goes into a bar and meets... Sinbad (Sinbad 2012)!
Fandoms: Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Sinbad (2012)
Word count: 1000
Rating/Contents: G, no archive warnings apply.
Summary: Finn needs to work on his undercover skills.
muccamukk: Spiral staircase decending multiple levels inside a tower.. (Musketeers: Faded)
Given this morning's news, I think I'll keep the CBC off until at least Easter, possibly May Day. More time for reading?

The Right to Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet by Sheila Watt-Cloutier
The content was very interesting, and Ms. Watt-Cloutier has led an inspiring life. I came in as a supporter, but learned a lot, particularly about the interactions between traditional knowledge and culture and policy. I was already familiar with a lot of the climate change issues, but they were well stated.

However, the writing is pretty workmanlike, and it was a rather dull read on the whole. I rarely got much spark or life from the book, when I know that Watt-Cloutier is a vibrant person. It was also a bit repetitive, and could have bumped a lot of lists of people to the end notes.

Well worth a read for such an interesting life, but didn't blow me away.


I picked up a couple of the DC-You (?) titles in trade, as they'd looked fun when they came out. Both were good choices. Though of course the first one is now cancelled. -sighs-

Black Canary Vol. 1: Kicking and Screaming by Brenden Fletcher, art by Annie Wu and Pia Guerra: I'm not that familiar with Canary, other than the basics, but this is a seriously fun comic. I loved all the band dynamics, and Annie Wu's art was phenomenal. Looking forward to the next trade.

DC Comics: Bombshells Vol. 1: Enlisted by Marguerite Bennett, art by Marguerite Sauvage: Pretty fun, and great to see all those women working together. So far the book has mostly been setting up the universe, and there hasn't been much in the way of plot, but I'm enjoying it so far. Given the title, I was worried the art would be too cheesecake for me, but it's hit a nice balance so far.

We watched the Paul Cornell episode of Elementary (4x17), which I haven't been keeping up with, but really enjoyed this time. Of course Cornell would write an episode that poked fun at but did not mock the superhero comics community, and we got continuity and Joan being 100% stone-cold badass. I should catch up.

Got season two of Miss Fisher, which we're still enjoying. I'm normally not that into the will they/won't they het couple thing, but Phyne and Jack have great chemistry, so it's been fun. Also, fan dancing.

We watched Inside Llewyn Davis, which Nenya ruled as more coherent and less depressing than Showpiercer but felt there should have been a plot. I quite liked it both as a picture of the '60s folk scene and as a portrait of a man in mourning, who is unable to express his grief through his art, even though the art form seems entirely suited for it.
muccamukk: Sinbad and Gunnar sitting together on the rail. Text: Shipmates. (Sinbad: Shipmates)
Title: On the Shoulders of the Sea by [archiveofourown.org profile] Dorinda
Fandom: Sinbad (2012)
Characters: Gunnar/Sinbad
Words: 2,200
Rating: Teen
Summary: Gunnar suffers, and Sinbad discovers it's not only from the sun.
Notes: Lovely, warm, intimate story with great character voices and correct first aid. What more could you want?

Oh, and [personal profile] gloss has been writing TFA fic, which I've been quite enjoying, especially this one:

Title: Hombres como las estrellas by [archiveofourown.org profile] gloss
Fandom: Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Characters: Finn/Poe
Words: 3,200
Rating: Mature
Summary: Havana, c. 1957: a low-level security forces employee helps a moody Communist escape.
Notes: Wonderfully realised AU with vivid descriptions and hot men in white shirts.

For International Women's Day, we had the other keeper over and drank Madeira and played Settlers. Nenya won, as usual.
muccamukk: Inked art of Tony with a black cat on his shoulder. (Marvel: Black Cat Tony)
I didn't do anything that was on my list yesterday afternoon, well, save look over the union stuff, but did have a nice nap.

We finished off season one of Miss Fisher Murder Mysteries a couple days ago, which remained delightful throughout, though I could have lived without the creepy guy in the last three episodes.

Last night we watched Snowpiercer, which was pretty entertaining in that it was Cap, the War Doctor and d'Artagnan v. the White Queen and Flight, on a train, with an axe. It was also pretty entertaining because Nenya was leaning against my shoulder chanting "What. The. Fuck?" for pretty much the whole movie. Other comments: "I really want a plot about how a reluctant leader is destined for greatness that isn't about a white guy," "Decorate Your Traincar Game: The Movie," and "I don't like it when bad things happen to hands!" (Me: "I wanted to watch the folk music movie, but here we are!") Someone said it was a movie they would have liked a lot when they were 14, which is more or less where I'm at with it, though it might have been too violent for 14!Me.

Meanwhile, another romance novel pallet cleanser that I didn't actually like:

What a Lady Craves (The Eton Boys Trilogy #1) by Ashlyn Macnamara
Well that was stupid.

I liked the heroine, and most of the secondary characters, but the hero had basically no redeeming qualities past those on the cover. I was actively rooting for them NOT to get together by about half way through, and by the end I was thinking, "Take the money and run, sweetheart. You can do better."

He was really, really dumb, and a terrible father, and kept insisting that he was acting because of honour, while everyone else kept, rightly, insisting that he was an idiot. He didn't listen, probably because he was too busy patronising the heroine.

Plus there some really uncomfortable Orientalist elements, and all the Asian characters were either subservient or barbaric. I was planning to give this two stars because at least the porn was decent, but then we hit the action climax with those ruthless Indians, and I sort of gave up on the book as a whole.

I mildly want to know if one character will get a love story, but he doesn't seem to be in any of the later books in the series, so I'll probably not bother.


The Book of Phoenix by Nnedi Okorafor, narrated by Robin Miles
So what do you really think of the military-industrial complex and corporate culture in America, Ms Okorafor?

I enjoyed this a lot more than the companion book in the series, though that was perhaps better written, on the whole (this one seemed to have a lot of small editing glitches). It's one of the few books I've read that ends with the world ending (we know this from the start), and I appreciated that, and enjoyed it.

I think one of my favourite aspects was the unreliable narrator, who is expressing a valid point of view, but who becomes increasingly unsympathetic, even as she is surely not wrong. I spent the book simultaneously rooting for her and going, oh dear, this won't end well.

Both women leading the books in this series are goddess who change the world, but I like that Okoafor also lets them be flawed, and in this case make one hell of a mistake.

(Incidentally, this was philosophically pretty similar to Showpiercer.)
muccamukk: Iron Man catches a falling Captain America (Marvel: Catch You)
Tiny owl was back for a bit this morning.

Title: Emanata (The Comics Will Break Your Heart Remix) by Anon for Now
Remixed from: Iron Man: The Watchers of the Moon by Muccamukk.
Fandom: Marvel 616
Characters: Steve/Tony, classic Avengers, Pepper, Sharon
Words: 30k
Rating: Teen
Summary: Steve Rogers has the opportunity to fulfill his childhood dreams of becoming a comic artist when eccentric billionaire, superhero patron, and obsessive comic enthusiast Tony Stark offers him a job drawing Iron Man.

But Tony Stark has no idea that Steve Rogers is really Captain America, the newest member of the Avengers.

And Iron Man has no idea that Captain America is really Steve Rogers, up-and-coming comic book artist.

And Steve doesn't know what to do about the fact that he's falling head over heels for them both.

Notes: IT'S SO SHINY I COULD DIE! Seriously, this fic is all the identity porn and feelings about comics that anyone could ever want. Plus it has a great relationship with the cracky little script fic I wrote as the original.


I edited my profile, being less in love with bullet points than I was of yore.


Watched Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith the other night, which I hated beyond reason. I spent far too much of the movie screaming at my laptop, and almost all of the rest making exasperated hand gestures. I'm so, so, so glad Lucas sold the rights, if this is what he thinks is a good way to treat female characters. I can't think of a film that's pissed me off that badly, that I've seen recently, anyway.

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